Lovely Package

Curating the very best packaging design

Seattle’s Best Coffee

December 19, 2010 | 6 Comments

Designed by Creature | Country: United States

“Seattle’s Best Coffee, part of Starbucks Corporation, today announced a radically simplified packaged coffee line designed to change the conventions of the coffee category. The Seattle’s Best Coffee “Level” System delivers great tasting, premium coffee with an expanded blend offering in conjunction with an innovative and bold new packaging concept. The Level System’s unique array of numbers and vivid colors tell consumers exactly what they want to know: which type of coffee fits their taste profile. Seattle’s Best Coffee is the first brand in the coffee category to offer this unique approach, which will begin hitting grocery and retail store shelves in December 2010.

With the new Level System, consumers will be able to easily find and choose from a selection of Seattle’s Best Coffee blends that span the entire range of coffee enjoyment, from a mild, light, crisp Level 1 to a bold, dark and intense Level 5. Each Level represents a finely tuned recipe crafted from decades of roasting experience, blended from beans carefully chosen for their nuances and characteristics, and carrying the hallmark taste of Seattle’s Best Coffee: velvety, round and smooth.

In addition to Levels 1 through 5, consumers can choose from a decaffeinated blend, an Organic Fair Trade CertifiedTM blend and flavored coffees Cinnamon (“C”) and Hazelnut (“H”). The new Level System lineup is currently replacing the existing Seattle’s Best Coffee products on shelves.

‘Ultimately, people select coffee based on taste and that can be hard to determine in today’s coffee aisle,’ said Andrew Linnemann, director, Green Coffee Quality, Starbucks Corporation. ‘Seattle’s Best Coffee is known for its smooth taste profile. Each Level has been sourced, blended and roasted with care and precision to meet consumers’ desire to simply enjoy a great tasting cup of coffee.’ ”

Comments

6 Responses to “Seattle’s Best Coffee”

  1. PJ
    February 25th, 2011 @ 1:46 pm

    I love your coffee. I have tried them all.
    I need to use less to make a good cup of coffee and it’s not bitter.

    I do not like the new packaging at all. I didn’t even know it was Seattles Best at first. It’s confusing. I liked the 6th Ave Bistro best.

    It looks cheap and tacky in my opinion. Don’t think it will catch on, but time will tell.

  2. Margaret Burbridge
    March 8th, 2011 @ 6:38 pm

    I have been drinking SBC since it was Smith Bros.over on Vashon Island. Now which of these packages should I buy when I want Henry’s Blend? Please go back to the red packaging.I actually bought some Charbucks because I couldn’t find my own favorite.

  3. Marckus Thorensen
    March 9th, 2011 @ 3:41 pm

    This whole concept is ridiculous. I have searched Wal-Mart and other stores for the past two months, assuming that they had typically dropped another favorite brand after so many years. Finally the other day I encountered an inventory person in that department and asked, was directed to the new packaging. However, being old, I could not read the tiny print showing the old flavor names even with my best glasses. Really stupid!

  4. Lovely Package
    April 8th, 2011 @ 3:26 pm

    Please. If you’re looking for a blend which no longer exists, or you are bummed out that you can’t find whatever flavour it is that you’re looking for, do not leave comments here as they will be deleted.

    You are better off contacting SBC directly as we are in no way affiliated with them. Our site exists to showcase beautiful packaging design. That’s it. That’s all.

    Thank you.

  5. Jim Warfield
    July 31st, 2011 @ 4:19 pm

    I miss the “old” SBC. I can’t find whole bean Seattle’s Best Coffee any more. You no longer offer mail order service. You’ve been gutted by Starbucks.

  6. Patrick
    September 11th, 2012 @ 3:18 am

    I don’t drink Seattle’s Best, but contrary to some of these other comments, I love this packaging. I think the numbering is nice, as it will appeal to the more “working class” coffee drinkers (which is exactly the company’s strategic target market) that don’t consider themselves stuck-up gastronomic connoisseurs, although it still attempts distinguish its variety and quality from more generic brands such as Folger’s and Maxwell House. For those of you who think this numbered packaging and marketing strategy is “below” you, consider switching to the company’s coffee that is marketed to the “higher class” coffee drinker, Starbucks.

Your Comment





Lovely Package

Curating the very best packaging design


Sponsors