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Student Work – Geneviève Côté

March 11, 2010 | 7 Comments

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Designed by Geneviève Côté | Country: Canada

“If it is indirectly the quest of spices that led to the discovery of the Americas by Europeans, the passion has definitely not had much influence on American cuisine and, in fact, except salt, pepper marginal and some spices, we are collectively ignorant regarding all these subtleties that distinguish the food of men from that of animals.

Geneviève Côté studying at École de design | UQAM has investigated this issue and tried to solve some problems identified as a cause for the cultural deprivation. First, the spices should not be exposed to light and therefore; she must develop an opaque package. Secondly, the fact that spices are often poorly identified and badly presented, there is a problem of identification but also recovery to be solved. In short, we forget the contents of all bags lying in the bottom of the closet and therefore we don’t use them. The major concept was based on the recovery of the spice through a very graphic gesture.

Genevieve was very busy in developing those pretty triangular prisms for a large number of spices known and less known. The result is striking and the modular boxes allow very interesting geometrical configurations.”

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Via Packaging | UQAM

Comments

7 Responses to “Student Work – Geneviève Côté”

  1. upon a fold
    March 11th, 2010 @ 5:36 pm

    This packaging is great! I would want to buy every spice in the range just so I could make shapes with all the pieces :)

  2. es
    March 12th, 2010 @ 2:02 am

    Doesn’t cardboard spoil the taste of spices ? (letting humidity in…)

  3. Lucia
    March 12th, 2010 @ 3:47 am

    super sweet, love that idea!!:)

  4. Anne Marie
    March 24th, 2010 @ 2:22 pm

    There are so many things wrong with this project I don’t even know where to begin.
    1. Cardboard bad
    2. How does this inspire americans to properly use the spices
    3. Easily disorganized in the cupboard

  5. Oskar
    June 21st, 2010 @ 7:21 am

    Love ‘em!

  6. Matt Balmer
    August 6th, 2010 @ 1:56 am

    Great idea, and it shows some forethought about how to present spices, but there’s a few major flaws in the physical design that will hurt you here:

    1) Cardboard (even lined) still breathes, and unless you’re dealing in whole spices, allowing air to reach through as well as moisture is a very, very bad thing for spices. They will go stale quicker on the shelf and will be much less desirable in the finished dish.

    2) Extremely tiny packaging – based on the scale you show with the cayenne box above, it looks like those little boxes will hold maybe 2 tbsp of any ground or dried spice. For some things, like cayenne and chili powder, this is okay, but for other things like basil, parsley, oregano, not so much. If I saw this in a store at the sizes you’re working with, I’d pass it by because it’s just too small.

    Aside from these two things, it’s an outstanding concept – I like the ability to create little geometric forms with the packages, too – makes remembering what I put in a dish easy. I’d change the packaging to an airtight opaque plastic triangular form (possibly with a snap-in shaker) and maybe up its size by one and one-half times. Then, go searching for the best spice sources you can find, and bottle away!

  7. Ryuk
    September 6th, 2010 @ 1:12 am

    >.< why doesn't my brain works like these?! so envious

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