Designed by: PepsiCo Design & Innovation
Country: United States

Lyle’s Golden Syrup Logo Redesign: A Shift from Traditional to Modern Branding

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In an unexpected turn, one might question the wisdom of using a logo featuring a long-deceased lion engulfed by bees when launching a brand. Such a decision might not be considered the most sensible choice in modern times. However, this is not the year 1885, and the product in question is not a syrupy concoction that resembles honey.

The fascinating tale behind this peculiar choice of logo belongs to Lyle’s Golden Syrup, a popular baking ingredient in the UK. This brand holds the Guinness World Record for the oldest unaltered logo and packaging design, or at least it used to.

af0a6f2cd9f684647bc0ff19ccea1a34.jpeg
New packaging.



In a recent attempt to attract younger consumers, Lyles announced a redesign of some of their packaging. The updated design replaces the deceased lion and bees with a tastefully designed lion’s head featuring a single, inconspicuous bee merging into the lion’s mane. This fresh design will adorn the brand’s plastic syrup and dessert bottles, but not the classic Lyle’s tin, thus preserving the brand’s Guinness record.

427952722_885687606899495_7280574994028063521_n.jpg



The original logo came about due to the religious beliefs of Lyle’s owner, Abram Lyle. He took inspiration from a quote from the Book of Judges: “Out of the eater came forth meat, and out of the strong came forth sweetness.” This quote originates from the story of Samson, who discovered a honeycomb inside the decomposing body of a lion he had previously killed. Lyle used the quote as a tagline underneath an illustration of the deceased lion.

425289903_887549080046681_8416428033581256004_n.jpg
Redesigned logo.



However, the redesign did not go without controversy, with the Daily Express labeling it as “woke” for reasons which are not entirely clear. Despite not all the product line undergoing a change, the brand is still sacrificing well-established recognition and equity on the shelf.

Who can predict how this will play out? This tale might baffle anyone who wouldn’t consider featuring a perished lion on a jar of non-honey product, even in the 19th century.

Featured image for Hey, Maybe You Should Get Rid Of That Dead Lion Logo: Lyle's Golden Syrup Redesigns After Nearly 140 Years

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Designed by: PepsiCo Design & Innovation
Country: United States

Lyle’s Golden Syrup Logo Redesign: A Shift from Traditional to Modern Branding

6
Lyle's Golden Syrup Logo Redesign: A Shift from Traditional to

In an unexpected turn, one might question the wisdom of using a logo featuring a long-deceased lion engulfed by bees when launching a brand. Such a decision might not be considered the most sensible choice in modern times. However, this is not the year 1885, and the product in question is not a syrupy concoction that resembles honey.

The fascinating tale behind this peculiar choice of logo belongs to Lyle’s Golden Syrup, a popular baking ingredient in the UK. This brand holds the Guinness World Record for the oldest unaltered logo and packaging design, or at least it used to.

af0a6f2cd9f684647bc0ff19ccea1a34.jpeg
New packaging.



In a recent attempt to attract younger consumers, Lyles announced a redesign of some of their packaging. The updated design replaces the deceased lion and bees with a tastefully designed lion’s head featuring a single, inconspicuous bee merging into the lion’s mane. This fresh design will adorn the brand’s plastic syrup and dessert bottles, but not the classic Lyle’s tin, thus preserving the brand’s Guinness record.

427952722_885687606899495_7280574994028063521_n.jpg



The original logo came about due to the religious beliefs of Lyle’s owner, Abram Lyle. He took inspiration from a quote from the Book of Judges: “Out of the eater came forth meat, and out of the strong came forth sweetness.” This quote originates from the story of Samson, who discovered a honeycomb inside the decomposing body of a lion he had previously killed. Lyle used the quote as a tagline underneath an illustration of the deceased lion.

425289903_887549080046681_8416428033581256004_n.jpg
Redesigned logo.



However, the redesign did not go without controversy, with the Daily Express labeling it as “woke” for reasons which are not entirely clear. Despite not all the product line undergoing a change, the brand is still sacrificing well-established recognition and equity on the shelf.

Who can predict how this will play out? This tale might baffle anyone who wouldn’t consider featuring a perished lion on a jar of non-honey product, even in the 19th century.

Featured image for Hey, Maybe You Should Get Rid Of That Dead Lion Logo: Lyle's Golden Syrup Redesigns After Nearly 140 Years

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