Designed by: PepsiCo Design & Innovation
Country: United States

Student Work – Audrée Lapierre

Updated on May 18th, 2010  |  
1 Minute Read

Student Work - Audrée Lapierre

Designed by Audrée Lapierre | Country: Canada

“Our concept was to design a packaging using nutritional facts about the food product. For the milk carton, we used the four sides to inform about the caloric ratio, nutrient balance, ingredients and amount per serving. The diagrams and data visualizations give important and useful information. For example, they quickly show if a food product has a higher proportion of fat.

The data visualizations say more than a regular nutritional facts label. For example, ingredients are visually linked to their corresponding components (carbohydrate, total fat, proteins, sodium, others). In the case of a bag of chips, you would immediately see that it contains lots of ingredients without nutritive value.

Nutritional information becomes the main goal of the packaging, while still carrying a powerful branding by combining an expressive form with useful information.”

Student Work - Audrée Lapierre

via UQAM

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Designed by: PepsiCo Design & Innovation
Country: United States

Student Work – Audrée Lapierre

1 Minute Read
MILK1

Student Work - Audrée Lapierre

Designed by Audrée Lapierre | Country: Canada

“Our concept was to design a packaging using nutritional facts about the food product. For the milk carton, we used the four sides to inform about the caloric ratio, nutrient balance, ingredients and amount per serving. The diagrams and data visualizations give important and useful information. For example, they quickly show if a food product has a higher proportion of fat.

The data visualizations say more than a regular nutritional facts label. For example, ingredients are visually linked to their corresponding components (carbohydrate, total fat, proteins, sodium, others). In the case of a bag of chips, you would immediately see that it contains lots of ingredients without nutritive value.

Nutritional information becomes the main goal of the packaging, while still carrying a powerful branding by combining an expressive form with useful information.”

Student Work - Audrée Lapierre

via UQAM

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